Howlin' Ray's in Far East Plaza

The Dining Guide to Far East Plaza in Chinatown

08/14/2017

Hope Ewing

Built in 1976, the Far East Plaza food mall in Chinatown has become iconic for its mix of old-school and new, creating a buzz among L.A.’s foodie crowd since local chef Roy Choi relocated his first brick-and-mortar there in 2013.

Since then, this unassuming two-story space has become a culinary destination for people from all over. Visitors come for authentic regional Asian bites, restaurant-hop for a taste of everything, or hunker down in line with coffee and ice cream, waiting for service at a trendy pop-up. Communal tables arranged between stands selling knick-knacks serve the many fast-casual options along the corridor. Positioned in the heart of Chinatown, the plaza is worth checking out whether you’re a fan of traditional Asian street food or seeking out the next big food thing.

Parking is easily found at surrounding paid lots; street parking is also available, but hard to come by with busy weekend crowds.

Dishes at Momed Atwater Village

The Dining Guide to Atwater Village

08/13/2017

Liz Ohanesian

The eclectic Atwater Village dining scene offers a wide range of flavors and price points. Head down to Los Feliz and Glendale Boulevards for the most options, ranging from budget-friendly snacks to more upscale, sit-down dinners. You'll find international favorites - Indian curries, Salvadoran pupusas, Armenian chicken - as well American classics in the restaurants that line Atwater Village streets. There are a lot of new, hip flavors to try too, like the out-of-the-ordinary ice cream selection at Wanderlust or the Mediterranean/Middle Eastern fusion dishes at Momed and Dune. Be forewarned: It's hard to eat just one meal in Atwater Village.

Fried Egg Sandwich at Joan's on Third

The Ultimate Guide to Breakfast in the Valley: Part One

08/05/2017

Karen Young

The San Fernando Valley is one of the largest regions in L.A. County. So naturally, it deserves an epic dining guide to breakfast. If you have a morning meet-up in the Valley, the age-old question is “where should we meet”? Well, look no further. From classic diners to modern eateries, here are 46 restaurants serving the most important meal of the day!

Shrimp and grits at Eagle Rock Brewery Public House

Where to Eat in Eagle Rock

06/26/2017

Liz Ohanesian

When in Eagle Rock, make sure you eat. This L.A. neighborhood is well-known for its mom-and-pop eateries that range from local institutions to foodie hot spots. Here, you'll find a wide variety of cuisines and plenty of restaurants that offer vegetarian options as well as joints that make serving locally-sourced and seasonal ingredients part of their mission. Whether you're in Eagle Rock for brunch or dinner, here are ten great neighborhood dining spots.

Smoked salmon toast at The Bellwether

Ventura Boulevard Dining Guide: Studio City to Woodland Hills

05/30/2017

Karen Young

Ventura Boulevard from Studio City to Woodland Hills runs about 13 miles—and in that space sits hundreds of restaurants—among them mom n’ pops, a plethora of ethnic cuisines, casual and fast food chains, gastropubs, and finer dining restaurants. The rundown here is by no means exhaustive, but rather a hit list of some of the best, and historically significant, on the boulevard for any dining occasion.

Dungeness crab at The Albright on the Santa Monica Pier

The Top 10 Restaurants Along the Metro Expo Line

05/22/2017

Joshua Lurie

The Metro Expo Line expanded from Culver City to Downtown Santa Monica in May 2016, opening up a new world of public transportation and dining possibilities. The light-rail now passes through a wealth of different cultures that capture L.A.’s brilliant diversity. From Downtown L.A. to the Santa Monica Pier, learn about 10 reliable dining options within a three-block walk of stations along the Expo Line.

Turkish-ish Breakfast at Kismet

Discover the New Wave of Modern Middle Eastern Restaurants In Los Angeles

04/23/2017

Karen Young

Middle Eastern cuisine has recently expanded from "mom and pops" and into James Beard Award-winning mainstream restaurants. Hummus and pita were the first crossovers to appear on menus at large chains; kabobs and falafels are becoming as familiar as spaghetti and meatballs; and a popular Middle Eastern breakfast dish, shakshuka - eggs baked in a spicy tomato/pepper sauce - now appears on menus alongside pancakes and French toast.

Spices such as sumac, za’atar, dukkah and harissa are now listed in menus. Other notable ingredients include freekah, an ancient whole-wheat grain poised to be the new quinoa; labneh (yogurt cheese) is featured as a topping, creamy mix-in, or dessert base; and pomegranates are used for its seeds and molasses.

Middle Eastern restaurants have been part of the Los Angeles dining scene for decades. Some of the best eateries in L.A. are located in mini malls and owned by families from Israel, Lebanon, Egypt, Turkey, Armenia, Morocco, Greece, Iran and other countries in the eastern Mediterranean. Meet the chefs and learn about the restaurants at the forefront of the new wave of modern Middle Eastern cuisine in Los Angeles.

Tamales at Loteria Grill

Ten Places in Los Angeles to Buy Tamales for the Holidays

12/01/2016

Karen Young

Founded by Chef Pascal Dropsy in 1994, Corn Maiden serves and sells nearly 30 varieties of lard-free, handmade tamales with no preservatives at farmers markets across L.A. County—from Pacific Palisades to Pasadena. Traditional ingredients combine with the more exotic, such as smoked Gouda, wild mushrooms, spaghetti squash, and red port wine. Dessert tamales include one with Belgian chocolate, raspberries and caramelized walnuts. Tamales wrapped in cornhusks are available in two sizes, run $19 to $28.50 a dozen, and can be kept for six months in the freezer.

For a list of products and farmers market locations, visit cornmaidenfoods.com. Call Alex at 310-560-0949 to order tamales for pick up at your local market.

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